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The Transformative Role of Physical Actions in Worship: Surrender, Trust, and Honor with W. David O. Taylor |  POD 020

The Transformative Role of Physical Actions in Worship: Surrender, Trust, and Honor with W. David O. Taylor | POD 020

WATCH

LISTEN

RESOURCES

A Body Of PraiseW. David O. Taylor

Open And Unafraid – W. David O. Taylor

Bono & Eugene Peterson | The Psalms – Produced by W. David O. Taylor

HOSTS & GUESTS

W. David O. Taylor – Guest

Bill Gorman – Co-Host

Gabe Coyle – Guest Host

 

Show Notes

The Transformative Role of Physical Actions in Worship: Surrender, Trust, and Honor

What is the role of our physical bodies in the context of worship? Our guest, W. David O. Taylor, a theologian and author, shares insights from his book A Body of Praise, which explores the various traditions around the incorporation of our bodies while we praise and worship. Join us as we uncover the invitation we have in Christ to bring our wholly integrated selves to our corporate gatherings and how it will impact the way we receive and respond to the gospel of Jesus each week.

THREE KEY TAKEAWAYS:
  • The body plays a crucial role in worship: W. David O. Taylor’s book, A Body of Praise, highlights the significance of the physical body in our worship of God. He challenges deficient ideas and practices surrounding the body in worship and invites readers to embrace a biblical vision of bodily life.
  • Cultural biases and traumas impact our engagement with our bodies in worship: Taylor emphasizes the influence of cultural biases and personal experiences on our understanding of what it means to embody worship. He discusses how these factors can be damaging and stresses the importance of creating inclusive spaces that honor and welcome those with disabilities.
  • Physical acts of worship shape our hearts and minds: The episode delves into the power of physical acts of worship in shaping us to be more Christ-like. Taylor shares personal anecdotes and examples from different traditions to highlight the transformative effect of physical worship. He emphasizes the importance of both spontaneous and prescribed actions, as well as the discipline and freedom that can be found in engaging our bodies in worship.

#WorshipInMotion #EmbodiedFaith #PhysicalActsOfWorship #BridgingTheGap #SilenceAndStillness #ResistingTheNoise #CommunityInWorship #CaughtNotTaught #TheFormedLifePodcast #WDavidTaylor #bono #eugenepeterson

 

GUEST BIO:

W. David O. Taylor is Associate Professor of Theology and Culture at Fuller Theological Seminary and the author of several books, including A Body of Praise: Understanding the Role of Our Physical Bodies in Worship, Open and Unafraid: The Psalms as a Guide to Life, and Glimpses of the New Creation: Worship and the Formative Power of the Arts. An Anglican priest, he has lectured widely on the arts from Thailand to South Africa. In 2016 he produced a short film on the psalms with Bono and Eugene Peterson. He lives in Austin, Texas, with his artist wife, Phaedra, with whom he produced three sets of illustrated prayer cards: “Prayers of the Psalms,” “Prayers for Life,” and “Prayers for Advent, Christmas and Epiphany.” They have also collaborated on a book of collections and paintings to be published by Intervarsity Press in the spring of 2024, Prayers for the Pilgrimage: A Book of Collects for All of Life.

 

QUOTES:

“We need to worship our God with our bodies in the same way that a sunflower is constantly turning its face to the sun.”
— W. David O. Taylor

 

 “I think those things can happen when we gather in worship, that the things that we do with our bodies, regardless of our personality, regardless of our emotions at the moment, can rein us to be Christ like or have a true Christ shaped humanity wherever we may find ourselves.”
— W. David O. Taylor

 

“So you see all throughout history how in Christ, really, every wall that divides us is broken down and broken down most centrally when people gather before the face of their maker in worship.”
— W. David O. Taylor

 

RESOURCES:

A Body Of PraiseW. David O. Taylor

Open And Unafraid – W. David O. Taylor

Bono & Eugene Peterson | The Psalms – Produced by W. David O. Taylor

 

CHAPTERS:

02:40 Missionaries influenced by Dallas Theological Seminary tradition
03:44 Thesis on Jesus’ healing significance
12:56 It’s important to worship God with our bodies
14:02 Offering bodies to God in worship is essential
17:25 Body actions enhance spiritual connection and worship
20:57 Sanctify, express integrity, worship, be truly free
26:09 God’s people worshiped together, breaking down barriers
30:13 Practicing silence to be fully present
32:17 Resisting daily distractions, prioritizing focused moments
37:17 Adapting children’s ministry to digital with creativity
38:22 Father and daughter enact Bible stories creatively

Exploring the Profound Impact of Music Therapy with Amy Wilson |  POD 019

Exploring the Profound Impact of Music Therapy with Amy Wilson | POD 019

WATCH

LISTEN

RESOURCES

HOSTS & GUESTS

Amy Wilson – Guest

Paul Brandes – Co-Host

Bill Gorman – Co-Host

Show Notes

Exploring the Profound Impact of Music Therapy with Guest Amy Wilson

Amy Wilson, a passionate music therapist with a unique career journey, joins us on theFormed.life podcast today. Amy shares her experiences working in the field of music therapy, highlighting the impact of music on individuals in various settings, including hospice care and behavioral health. In this episode, we get a glimpse into the beauty that can unfold as we begin to more fully integrate our faith and work.

THREE KEY TAKEAWAYS:
  • Music therapy’s profound impact in various settings: Amy Wilson’s work, particularly in the context of hospice care and behavioral health demonstrates how music can bring beauty and connection to individuals facing challenging circumstances and provide moments of joy and reminiscence, even in the face of deep pain and difficulty.
  • The integration of faith and work: Amy’s relationship with Jesus and her work as a music therapist is part of her greater calling to connect with and serve others on a deeper level. Her  journey from a performance degree to music therapy is a testament to the value of integrating faith and work.
  • The importance of personal connection and storytelling: Amy shares specific stories that illustrate the impact of music therapy in real people’s lives, highlighting the significance of building relationships, learning favorite songs, and using music to access long-term memories and foster connection. She reminds us of the power of live music and its ability to create intimate and personal moments that can be key elements in anyone’s healing process.

#musictherapy #careerinspiration #integratingfaithandwork #hospicecare #therapeuticsounds #beautyinthebrokenness #musicandmemory #thehealingpowerofmusic #findingpurpose #joyofconnection

 

GUEST BIO:

Amy Wilson grew up in Oklahoma, with both of her parents working in the medical field. Yet, she found herself drawn to a different form of therapy – music therapy. Amy discovered music therapy by chance and was captivated by its ability to combine music with a therapeutic relationship to achieve learning or health goals. Intrigued by this unique approach, Amy felt a strong calling to pursue a career as a licensed music therapist. With her passion ignited, Amy embarked on a journey to learn and understand the power of music in healing and education. Inspired by her own story and the potential of music therapy, Amy is now dedicated to using music as a tool to bring about positive change and support individuals in various settings.

 

QUOTES:

“Music Therapy: Essentially, it’s applying music in the context of a relationship, And the goal is either some kind of learning objective, like in schools, or it’s a health objective as in a medical setting.”
— Amy Wilson

 

 “I did some volunteer work in hospitals and had a really significant experience, actually through my church and our Sunday school class. I was with a group of girls from 7th grade to 12th grade in our Baptist church at the time, and I don’t remember the context or why, but we started visiting a woman in the hospital who was pretty much alone and essentially dying of cancer. And we visited her on Sundays for months, and I don’t think this would ever happen now. But we got to be a part of Just her journey.”
— Amy Wilson

 

“Because of the way memory is stored in the brain and how we can access some of those long term memories through music, Even in the case of disease or injury,  it’s really amazing What can happen.”
— Amy Wilson

 

RESOURCES:

BLOG – Two Tools To Fight The Darkness – Paul Brandes

BOOK – Music Is Medicine – Deforia Lane

 

 

CHAPTERS:

[00:06:24] God guided me to hospice care, and music therapy.
[00:08:02] Music therapists in the United States: credentials, ethics, education, job opportunities.
[00:12:53] Impact of music therapy on real lives.
[00:13:56] Music therapy for degenerative neurologic disease patient.
[00:17:34] Connection, music, memories, creator – a beautiful gift.
[00:21:38] Evil person says music connects to relationships.
[00:25:57] Various ways to access music; importance of live music.
[00:29:11] End of work liturgy podcast for transition.
[00:30:22] Switching careers, what profession would you choose?

Understanding the Connection: Faith, Work, and Discovering God’s Will for Your Career |  POD 018

Understanding the Connection: Faith, Work, and Discovering God’s Will for Your Career | POD 018

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... | READ MORE BELOW

RESOURCES

HOSTS & GUESTS

Paige Wiley – Guest

Paul Brandes – Co-Host

Bill Gorman – Co-Host

Show Notes

Understanding the Connection: Faith, Work, and Discovering God’s Will for Your Career

How should faith and work intersect? Today we have a special guest, Paige Wiley, joining us. Paige brings a wealth of knowledge and experience, having worked in various settings and ministries and now working within the team at Made To Flourish as the Associate Director of Engagement. In this episode, we explore the importance of understanding one’s vocation and how it connects to our faith, as well as the anxiety and questions that arise when it comes to discerning God’s will in our careers. Paige shares insights from her recent project on bridging the gap between college and the next phase of life as well as the fascinating concept of “skills mapping” for churches and how it can be utilized to foster community and discipleship. Listen now to this thought-provoking conversation about work, calling, and the journey towards finding purpose in our daily lives.

 

THREE KEY TAKEAWAYS:
  • The importance of integrating faith and work: There is a journey to understanding the connection between faith and work. Work is not just a means of evangelizing or giving money to the church, but a valuable way to live out God’s design and contribute to the restoration of all things.
  • Addressing vocational anxiety: There is increasing anxiety among college students about their future careers and which has increased the need to make a meaningful connection between work and identity. There is a common fallacy of viewing God’s will as a specific target or destination, which can contribute to stress and anxiety. For this reason we need to talk early and often about faith and work to alleviate vocational anxiety.
  • Utilizing skills mapping for church community and discipleship: Skills mapping is a process that helps churches understand the vocational skills and passions of their congregation, and can be used to create support groups and facilitate connections among individuals with similar professions or roles. We want churches to engage with people across different life stages, including young adults and older adults, to foster community and discipleship around the work that we do, paid or unpaid.

#FaithAndWork #CallingAndVocation #BridgingTheGap #SkillMapping #ConnectingCongregations #SundayToMonday #IntegratingFaithAndLife #SupportingProfessionals #ThirdThirdOfLife #ChurchBeyondSunday

 

GUEST BIO:

Paige Wiley grew up in a Christian environment where work and faith were presented as separate entities. This upbringing shaped her curiosity about the intersection of work and calling. While studying communications and media at Kansas State University, Paige was heavily involved in her campus ministry and also worked at a career center, helping students discover their career paths. This experience intensified her interest in understanding why people choose a certain profession and what drives their vocational choices.

 

QUOTES:

“At the end of the day, my belief was that work is part of this necessary evil that we have to do in order to either evangelize to our coworkers or to give our money to the church.”
— Paige Wiley

 

“Within redemption, we get to see how work is a way of loving and serving our neighbor, and this allows us to see glimpses of heaven.”
— Paige Wiley

 

“One of the ways that I like to frame it is: A good shepherd knows his sheep, and the skill mapping survey is really meant to ask folks where they’re at. Instead of asking to put more on their plate, ask, “What’s on your plate? What are you doing? Where are you already on mission, where are you already serving?””
— Paige Wiley

 

RESOURCES:

Made To Flourish

Skill Mapping

Worked Up – Paige Wiley & Luke Bobo

Work Matters: Connecting Sunday Worship to Monday Work – Tom Nelson

Every Good Endeavor: Connecting Your Work to God’s Work – Tim Keller

Just Do Something: A Liberating Approach to Finding God’s Will – Kevin DeYound

Whatever You Do: Six Foundations for an Integrated Life – Luke Bobo

God at Work: Your Christian Vocation in All of Life – Gene Veith

Designing Your Life: How to Build a Well-Lived, Joyful Life – Bill Burnett and David J. Evans

 

CHAPTERS:

[00:06:10] Faith and work: wrestling and finding fulfillment.
[00:08:10] God at the center, wrestling with work theology.
[00:12:51] College students struggle with identity and anxiety.
[00:15:14] God’s will as a problematic treasure hunt.
[00:17:46] Gathering to discuss faith and work after college.
[00:22:20] Made to Flourish offers a skill mapping process.
[00:26:28] Interviews explore Monday life of congregation members.
[00:29:26] Connecting educators, healthcare workers, entrepreneurs, and parents.
[00:32:46] Is God with me in career choices?
[00:34:38] Dream job for Paige Wiley.

The Unhurried and Unstoppable Mission of God

The Unhurried and Unstoppable Mission of God

For over two decades we have been committed in our church mission and organizational culture to narrow the Sunday to Monday gap so perilously prevalent in the American church. In the power of the Spirit and with biblical wisdom we have increasingly become a local church congregation with Monday in mind. As a church family we have never been more intentional or more committed to the primacy of vocational discipleship and vocational mission. Yet, I believe two of the most compelling realities for us to keep close to our hearts in narrowing the Sunday to Monday gap are gospel plausibility and proclamation, both of which are more important than ever in our increasingly secular age.

 

Seeing is Believing

The goodness of the gospel so often needs to be seen by others around us before it is truly heard from us. Taking the time to look back at church history reinforces this timeless truth. A particularly insightful church historian is scholar Alan Krieder. Like fellow early church historian Rodney Stark, the question of what enabled the early church to grow as it did against fierce cultural headwinds and formidable odds is one that captures their intellectual curiosity and disciplined research focus. In his excellent book, The Patient Ferment of the Early Church, Krieder puts it this way; “Why did this minor mystery religion from the eastern Mediterranean—marginal, despised, discriminated against—grow substantially, eventually supplanting the well-endowed, respectable cults that were supported by the empire and aristocracy? What enabled Christianity to be so successful that by the fifth century it was the established religion of the empire?”

 Kreider answers this question by pointing to several factors we are wise to emulate. First, he describes what he calls habitus, that is, the very down-to-earth reflexive bodily behavior exhibited in the mysterious mundane of daily life where the early Christians lived, worked, and played. Kreider writes, “Their behavior said what they believed; it was an enactment of their message. And the sources indicate that it was their habitus more than their ideas that appealed to the majority of the non-Christians who came to join them.”  The early church theologian Cyprian summarizes Christian habitus as a non-compartmentalized, comprehensive, and distinct way of life. What we might describe as an integral and coherent life embraced not only on Sunday, but also lived on Monday. Cyprian wrote, “we do not speak great things, we live them.” It was the early Christians’ distinct lives forged and formed in a highly relational community that spoke volumes of plausibility to a curious and watching world. 

 

A Curious Lifestyle

Kreider points particularly to the virtue of patience. At first blush this may be a bit surprising, but the early Christians viewed God’s sovereign mission as “unhurried and unstoppable.” The result was they placed less emphasis on bold strategies and more emphasis on morally and virtuously distinct lifestyles that would be organically and relationally influential over time. The early Christians were known and at times scorned and ostracized for their sexual purity ethic, sanctity of life ethic–particularly for the unborn and newborn, their diligent work ethic, their sacrificial caring for the poor, and for a lifestyle of non-violence. 

 

Working Together

The gospel and its transformational influence was primarily spread in the context of the marketplace. Ordinary Christians, not clergy, were the missional key. Kreider notes, “Christians followed their business opportunities.” Pointing out the witness of Christians, Kreider notes that non-Christians observed distinct Christian differences in the marketplace. Non-Christians “experienced the way they (Christians) did business with them, the patient way the Christians operate their businesses.” Kreider summarized the profound impact of vocational discipleship and vocational mission. “What happened was this. Non-Christians and Christians worked together and lived near each other. They became friends.”

 

A Distinct Lifestyle

While the early church was far from perfect, their pluralistic cultural context is in many ways remarkably similar to our 21st century western world. There is much for us to learn from the remarkable legacy they left behind in shaping the Christian church. Kreider’s helpful insights on the early church’s long-term impact resonate deeply with our church for Monday strategic emphasis. It is our hope that vocational discipleship will bring increased spiritual formation and with it a distinct lifestyle and bold verbal witness to our local, national, and global marketplace. 

While we desire to employ our best creativity and strategic thinking moving forward, we are wise to remember the early church’s patient ferment, knowing that in redemptive history as it unfolds in front of our eyes, God’s mission is unhurried and unstoppable. With a tenacious trust, an unhurried pace, and a patient posture, may we not only speak great things, but also live them before a curious and watching world.